Google+ Twitter Pinterest Facebook LinkedIn Wordpress

Robots in the Driving Seat

Robots in the Driving SeatAs the Logistics Industry continues to catapult into the world of modern technology, many more processes are becoming automated, warehouse practices and procedures are becoming more efficient, humans are working alongside robots, and most recently robots are replacing human roles in the workplace, via robotic process automation, and driver-less vehicles.

With the notion of autonomous lorries being present, and the news that they will be hitting UK roads in the very near future of 2019, understandably there are concerns being raised as to whether they truly are the buoyant life-saver that the logistics industry perceives to have been thrown.

Many with a supportive view believe that autonomous trucks are literally driving the Logistics Industry into the future and beyond. There are numerous positive outcomes from Autonomous trucks: requirement for paid human labour becomes resigned, routes become more economic in terms of fuel and finance, and driving becomes almost relinquished of all human error. In support of this, Swedish transport company Scania believes autonomous lorries could use far less fuel as they will drive much closer together, whilst controlled by wirelessly communicating onboard computers.

In addition to being a sustainable solution to the shortage of haulage drivers, machines are also trumping humans, in terms of not needing to be salaried, or diligently checked; and as regulations become stricter over time, driverless vehicles will save many companies time, and reputation, due to robots not being susceptible to drowsiness, or substance abuse, almost eradicating drivers’ errors.

Yet although there are those who actively appease autonomous trucks, and argue that they are the way forwards, ultimately, these trucks are not driving themselves; and there are opposing views, which do not seem to think that us humans are yet ready to take our hands off the wheel and our eyes off the road.

Whilst the news of autonomous lorries, on the surface seems to be beneficial to not only the drivers, but also to the Logistics Industry as a whole, there are certainly opposing views, for good reason. Less than a year ago, Tesla were testing their own autonomous vehicles which resulted in not just a casualty, but a death. 

Whilst this does not mean that all autonomous vehicles should be tarnished with the same brush, it does need to be recognised that a tired and intoxicated lorry driver, and an unresponsive autonomous vehicle can still cause fatalities; of which both are equally responsible for failing to recognise and prevent a potential collision, and any ensuing collateral damage. 

Prejudiced views aside, it is predicted that autonomous trucks will reduce the amount of human labour, and therefore eliminate the risk of human error; additionally, self-driving trucks are also predicted to use less fuel, and reduce congestion, and overall prove to be more efficient than our current lorries. 

Whilst autonomous vehicles eliminate the ‘baggage’ of human drivers, responsibility is no less diminished; at present driver-less vehicles still remain a relatively new concept, for which we do not yet hold all the answers, of which their determined success will be something only time can tell. One thing for certain is that if computers are to rule road, their communications need to be fast and reliable to prevent collisions.

With plans rolling out in 2019, in Holland, Germany and the UK, the reality of self-driving trucks will be amongst us sooner than we realise. 

 

⇐ Back to Featured Articles




Testimonials

More Testimonials

Latest News

Coming Soon – New SCCG Newsletter!

  As the year draws to a close, and the seasonal spirit has arrived, The Supply Chain Consulting…

Continue Reading

Register as our Guest!

  Join The Supply Chain Consulting Group at IntraLogisteX 2019 in Hall 1 of the Ricoh Arena Coventry UK, Tuesday…

Continue Reading

More News Stories

Featured Articles

Cyber Monday - The Seasonal Surge

  Basking in the aftermath of its omnichannel retail-rival Black Friday, Cyber Monday patiently lay in-wait for the hordes of already keen consumers, in…

‘Black Friday’, Ecommerce Economy, and Omni-Channel Solutions

  As the evenings draw longer, and the days shorter, it can only mean one thing, the festive season is nearly upon us, and the arrival of Black Friday…

Managing Damage Limitation within Supply Chain Cyber Security

 As we approach the end of 2018, and technology undeniably exponentially expands its intelligence and purpose, the question on everyone’s lips, is…

UK Manufacturing - What's The Trade Off?

Problems prevalent specifically within the manufacturing sector, combined with upcoming National Manufacturing day - honoured annually on the first Friday of…

Digital Drives Delivery Within Charities

Any business, within any sector, including charities, will experience a mixture of reactions to the ever-increasing availability of operational digitisation,…

Shrinking the Surplus Within the Supply Chain

Official statistics from the environment, food and rural affairs committee, report that the UK throws away a staggering 8.1 million tons of food every…

Is Digital Visibility vital for Survival within the Fashion Industry?

McKinsey Global Fashion Index’s predictions for the global fashion industry, were for sales to grow by 3.5 to 4.5 percent in 2018. Yet, as new figures…

Sustainable Fashion; Idolised Ideal or Attainable Attire?

Fashion plays an important role in the global economy and is responsible for annual worldwide revenues of in excess of £1 trillion; supporting hundreds…

How 3D printing is changing supply

After 30 years in development, practical applications of 3D printing are now becoming commonplace and disrupting traditional businesses. Supply chains…

Supermarket Mergers and Supply Chain Consequences

Since their acquisition of Argos back in 2016, it seems Sainsburys have been left with an insatiable appetite for more; and as we approach mid-year 2018, the…

Gideon Hillman Consulting is a trading name of The Supply Chain Consulting Group Ltd is registered in England and Wales.
Company Registration No: 09751027. Registered office at Highdown House, 11 Highdown Road, Leamington Spa, CV31 1XT. UK
A supply chain and logistics specialist with knowledge of process modelling, stock management tools and material sourcing

CMI Awards Finalist 2010 SHD Logistics Awards UKWA Customer Service Award Finalist 2014 SHD Logistics Awards Finalist 2016 UKWA Winner 2016 SHD Logistics Awards Finalist 2015 ISO 9001 RegisteredLogistics Awards Finalist 2018Supply Chain Excellence Awards 2018